Articles & Resources

We have been publishing articles for over 30 years to address the myriad of issues that interviewers encounter in the process of hiring top talent. Our library of articles is available below for your review.

16 of 286 Articles Found

  • Jul 1995

    High Tech Women Get High Marks

    Female executives traditionally have been in short supply in high tech firms, but technology-driven companies are currently hiring more senior executive women than ever before.

  • Apr 1994

    Men, Women & Computers

    If women and men communicate differently, is this difference reflected in their attitudes toward computers? Some gender communication experts emphatically say yes.

  • Jan 1994

    Gender Bias Starts Early

    Why are there fewer females in science, math, engineering, and technical disciplines? At least one reason may be the way girls are treated by their teachers.

  • Oct 1993

    Legal Lunacy

    Recently, a self-defense class for women at Stanford University was cancelled after an anonymous complaint of discrimination against men.

  • Jul 1993

    Martians to Appear Weekly

    John Gray, Ph.D., author of Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus is expanding his concept into another dimension ­ television.

  • Jul 1993

    Equal Pay ­ All Talk, No Act(ion)

    Thirty years after the Equal Pay Act, women's salaries still lag far behind men's. At times, the pay gap has actually widened from one year to the next.

  • Apr 1993

    "Pssst Employees...Here's How to Sue Us"

    California might be in the forefront of what may occur across the nation regarding sexual harassment. As of January 1993, a law in California requires every employer to teach their employees about sexual harassment.

  • Apr 1993

    Men are From Mars

    Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus (1) is the intriguing title of a current New York Times bestseller authored by John Gray, a neighbor of ours in Marin County, California. The ideas in his book confirm many of our own experiences in relationships, and have relevance to principles we teach in two of our seminars ­Interviewing Today's® Workforce and Diversity at Work.

  • Apr 1993

    Glass Walls Support Glass Ceiling

    While women and people of diverse backgrounds have been pounding on the infamous glass ceiling, glass walls have been built up around them.

  • Oct 1992

    Wedding Rings Off or On?

    Felice Schwartz found that married women students routinely removed their wedding rings before job interviews with on-campus male recruiters. Why? The women students believed that male recruiters used this formula: "Woman = Baby = No commitment."

  • Oct 1992

    Women Take Action

    In a recent and highly publicized scandal, sexual harassment charges against the Navy Tailhook Association resulted in two Navy admirals losing their jobs and a third being reassigned. Add to this the earlier resignation of the Secretary of the Navy and it is obvious that considerable damage has been done to the Navy's reputation.

  • Jul 1992

    Sexism - From Denial to Action

    Awareness and action on feminist issues seems to be moving along a continuum that has important implications for interviewers. Recognizable touchstones along this continuum are Denial­Collusion­Awakening­Anger­Action.

  • Jul 1992

    Cookie Cutter Interviews

    Many campus interviewers use the same questions all day long. By learning in advance how the interview will be conducted, savvy students gain a definite advantage over other students seeking the same job.

  • Jul 1992

    Improve Your ROI 56%

    By building family concerns into worker benefits, accommodating companies are starting to decrease female turnover.

  • Apr 1991

    . . . Women as Leaders

    A study of high-level executives by the executive search firm Russell Reynolds Associates revealed a key finding that counters the common perception that women rarely advance to top corporate levels because they lack leadership qualities.

  • Apr 1991

    Diversity at the Top

    Diversity can be achieved by training managers to make sure they recognize and set aside cultural and gender stereotypes that obscure good staffing decisions.